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It's Perfect Weather For Bikes. And Bike Helmets! Here's Why You Should Wear Them ...

Spring into Bike Safety

 

MADISON  HEALTH  DEPARTMENT  PRESS RELEASE

BICYCLE HELMETS

Spring is here!  The temperature outside is climbing everyday, and adults and children are anxiously getting their bicycles, scooters and roller-blades ready to go out riding in the sunshine. Are they wearing their helmets?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, many are not. Among the 96 million bicyclists in the United States approximately 700 deaths and 500,000 emergency room visits occur annually as a result of bicycle injuries. 62% of those deaths and 32% of the injuries involve head trauma to those riding without helmets. Wearing a helmet is an effective way to reduce the risk for head injuries.

 The risk for head injuries among persons not using helmets is 4 to 6 times greater than that among persons using helmets. Although an approved bicycle helmet is mandated for children under age 12, it has been noted that fewer than 2% of U.S. children and fewer than 10% of all U.S. bicyclists wear helmets.

 The Madison Health Department encourages all bicyclists and roller-bladers - old and young - to wear a helmet whenever out riding. 

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Pem McNerney March 21, 2012 at 10:31 PM
I always hate to see people riding without helmets, particularly when there are adults riding with kids, and all of them without helmets. On the other hand, I see kids blithely peddling down the street, helmets atop their heads, chin straps unfastened and flapping in the breeze. Parents, keep reminding your kids to wear helmets, and to wear them properly!
Maureen Lopes March 22, 2012 at 05:38 PM
I hope this is also a good reminder to drivers to remember to look out for and show courtesy to riders. Last week I made the mistake of bicycling up Mungertown Road onto Green Hill around mid-afternoon. The number and speed of cars going in and away from the schools was scary.
Pem McNerney March 22, 2012 at 06:02 PM
Good point Maureen. Here is a recent state law relating to that: "“THREE-FEET” PASSING RULE – IT’S THE LAW! Public Act 08-101, effective October 1, 2008, requires Connecticut motorists to allow at least three feet of separation when overtaking and passing cyclists. Failure to do so could cause motorists to receive a fine. Because of the large disparities in size, weight and speed between bicycles and motor vehicles, cyclists are at a tremendous disadvantage in the result of a collision with a car or truck. This new law strives to increase motorist awareness of bicycles, and to make conditions safer by preventing collisions." Source: http://www.ct.gov/dot/cwp/view.asp?a=2314&q=433254 Anyone who bikes knows that that is all too often ignored. Biker beware for sure.
Matt March 23, 2012 at 06:39 PM
What boggles my mind is when I see a little kid riding with a parent. The kid has a helmet on but not the parent. What is that saying to the kid?? To the people who don't wear them, I would ask this... would you open the door of a car and jump out onto the pavement going 15mph? It would be exactly the same as going down off a bike at 15mph.
Andrew Kaplan March 24, 2012 at 02:35 PM
I started to race bike in the 80's and have watched the evolution of bike helmets from flimsy "hair net" helmets made out of leather that offered little protection to heavy bulky helmets that were heavy and uncomfortable to wear. Then In 1986 a designer named Jim Gentes designed an adult bike helmet that was both lightweight and comfortable. In my humble opinion a monument should erected for him to commemorate the countless lives saved by this lightweight marvel. Wear your helmet, two of my friends had crashes that broke their helmet and NOT their head. They are both alive and well thank to Mr Gentes invention.

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